Committee on Consumer and Worker Protection

Apr 17, 2024

·

10:00 AM

1 hr 22 min

A hearing on enforcement of the NYC Fair Workweek Law covering scheduling practices in the fast food, retail, and utility safety industries. Discussions focused on the Department of Consumer and Work… Show More A hearing on enforcement of the NYC Fair Workweek Law covering scheduling practices in the fast food, retail, and utility safety industries. Discussions focused on the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection's (DCWP) enforcement metrics, long case resolution times often exceeding a year, numerous unresolved Starbucks worker complaints, and measuring the law's impact on worker wellbeing beyond monetary settlements. Featured testimony from DCWP, advocacy groups, impacted workers, researchers, and the public. Show Less

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REMARKS

# Council Member Julie Menin opens legislative hearing on Fair Workweek Law enforcement and worker protection

0:00:42

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4 min

Council Member Julie Menin opens the legislative hearing to discuss the enforcement and impact of the Fair Workweek Law.

  • Menin highlights the negative effects of unpredictable work schedules on workers' health and well-being, disproportionately affecting workers of color and women
  • She reviews the background and provisions of the Fair Workweek Law covering fast food, retail, and utility safety industries
  • Menin emphasizes the law's enforcement metrics and the need to ensure compliance and worker protection
  • The hearing agenda includes DCWP's enforcement effectiveness, case resolution times, reported violations like those at Starbucks, and the law's impact on working families

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TESTIMONY

# Vilda Vera Mayuga, Commissioner of the NYC Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP), on Enforcement of the NYC Fair Workweek Law and Worker Protections

0:05:41

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6 min

Vilda Vera Mayuga testified about DCWP's enforcement of the NYC Fair Workweek Law, designed to address scheduling instability in the fast food and retail industries. The law mandates advance scheduling notice, prohibits on-call shifts, provides premium pay for schedule changes, and prevents involuntary part-time work for covered employees.

  • Since the law's 2017 implementation, DCWP has recovered approximately $27 million in restitution for workers and $2 million in penalties
  • This includes a $20 million settlement with Chipotle, the largest worker protection settlement in NYC history
  • In the past year, DCWP secured over $7 million for nearly 4,000 workers from companies like Paris Baguette and Panda Express
  • DCWP conducts proactive outreach with over 1,400 events since 2018 to educate workers and employers
  • Under Mayor Adams, DCWP has secured $37 million in relief for 28,000 workers through workplace law enforcement

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QUESTION

# How many workers are covered under the Fair Workweek law?

0:12:10

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11 sec

Commissioner Vilda Vera Mayuga states that approximately 57,000 workers are believed to be covered under the Fair Workweek law.

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QUESTION

# How many fast food workers, retail workers, and utility workers are covered under the Fair Workweek law?

0:12:22

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29 sec

Vilda Vera Mayuga, the commissioner of the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection, provides the numbers for fast food and retail workers covered under the Fair Workweek law.

  • There are 57,000 fast food workers covered
  • There are 203,000 retail workers covered
  • The number of utility workers covered is not provided

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QUESTION

# What details can you provide about complaints concerning the safety of utility workers?

0:12:51

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45 sec

The council member inquires about complaints related to the safety of utility workers and expresses concern over a lack of reported complaints. The assistant commissioner explains that after updates to relevant laws a few years ago, unions representing utility workers were often able to negotiate agreements providing protections comparable to or better than the Fair Work Week laws.

  • The assistant commissioner states he has been in regular contact with the union representing these workers.
  • He encourages reporting any complaints to his department for investigation.
  • His department is willing to review and address grievances related to utility worker safety.

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QUESTION

# Why are there no complaints from utility safety workers?

0:13:37

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40 sec

The Assistant Commissioner of External Affairs states there are no complaints from utility safety workers because the workers have achieved compliance through their collective bargaining agreements with employers.

  • The Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP) has not received complaints from these workers
  • However, DCWP has been receiving more complaints overall since updating their systems
  • The DCWP remains open to any complaints utility safety workers may have regarding worker rights, consumer issues, or financial empowerment

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QUESTION

# What were the numbers of Fair Workweek violation complaints received by the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP) in 2023, 2022, 2021, 2020, and 2018?

0:14:18

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65 sec

The DCWP received 200 Fair Workweek violation complaints in 2023, more than the previous few years.

  • In 2022, the DCWP received 100 Fair Workweek violation complaints.
  • In 2021, the DCWP received 53 Fair Workweek violation complaints.
  • In 2020, the DCWP also received 53 Fair Workweek violation complaints.
  • In 2018, the DCWP received 181 Fair Workweek violation complaints.

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QUESTION

# What are the most common complaints about violations of the Fair Workweek Law?

0:15:27

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56 sec

The Deputy Commissioner states that common complaints include:

  • Not giving workers access to additional work hours
  • Not posting work schedules on time
  • Not paying required premium pay
  • Wrongful reductions in workers' hours

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QUESTION

# What is the allegation with the highest number of complaints in 2023?

0:16:24

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28 sec

The Deputy Commissioner states that the allegation with the highest number of complaints in 2023 is failure to post and provide the work schedule.

This refers to employers not properly posting and giving schedules to workers

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QUESTION

# What is the status of complaints filed against Starbucks regarding alleged violations?

0:16:52

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71 sec

The commissioner states that the department is actively investigating all complaints against Starbucks.

  • The complaints involve 56 Starbucks stores and 76 complainants
  • Some complaints were initially filed as early as February of the previous year
  • The department has dedicated resources to this investigation
  • They are in contact with workers and Starbucks to gather documents
  • The goal is to reach the appropriate resolution regarding the alleged violations

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QUESTION

# What is DCWP's procedure for notifying companies of worker complaints?

0:18:05

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86 sec

The Commissioner explains that when DCWP, it proceeds with the following steps:

  • An investigator is assigned to contact the worker and gather complaint details
  • The scope (localized or widespread) and issues are identified
  • Documents from worker and company are analyzed by attorneys and data scientists
  • Violations are identified based on the analysis
  • The company is notified of DCWP's findings to resolve the case

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QUESTION

# What are the requirements for notifying companies about filed complaints against them?

0:19:31

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122 sec

The Department of Consumer And Worker Protection (DCWP) has no statutory or regulatory requirement specifying a timeframe to notify companies after a complaint is filed against them.

  • There is no law or rule mandating a deadline for DCWP to inform companies of complaints filed
  • Council Member Menin expresses concern over delays in resolving complaints, which can be prolonged if companies are not promptly notified
  • Menin urges DCWP to establish procedures to swiftly notify companies upon receiving a complaint
  • Commissioner Mayuga explains DCWP conducts thorough reviews, resulting in varying case resolution timelines
  • Mayuga states DCWP's process has successfully obtained restitution for workers while staying engaged with parties

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QUESTION

# Why is it now taking longer for the agency to resolve fair work week complaints compared to previous years?

0:21:38

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126 sec

Council Member Menin asks why, in 2022, the number of days to resolve a fair workweek complaint was 345 days, which is over 5 times longer than the 64 days it took in 2018. The commissioner explains the resolution process, while noting that in 2023, the time was down to 156 days.

  • The commissioner states that in 2023, it took 156 days to resolve investigations on average
  • The duration varies based on the complexity and length of each case
  • In some years, cases may be more complex leading to longer resolution times
  • In other years, cases may be less complex allowing for shorter resolution times
  • Regardless of variation, the agency prioritizes expediting casework

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QUESTION

# How many staff members are assigned to investigate fair workweek law violations and what is the typical investigation process?

0:23:49

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56 sec

The Commissioner explains the staffing and process for DCWP investigations into fair workweek law violations.

  • The Office of Labor Policy and Standards (OLPS) has 44 staff members assigned to handle cases.
  • The number of staff assigned varies based on the complexity and size of each case.
  • Investigations involve a team with attorneys, data scientists, investigators and others.
  • Staff are strategically reassigned across cases to address them efficiently and move them along quickly.
  • There is no set number of staff per case or investigator.

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QUESTION

# What is the difference in resolution times for fast food and retail complaints, and what has the agency done to improve complaint resolution?

0:24:59

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129 sec

Council Member Menin notes that in 2022, it took 440 days to resolve fast food complaints and 302 days to resolve retail complaints, and asks what is being done to improve time. The agency notes that the 2023 numbers show they have reduced the time to resolve complaints from 400 days in 2022 to 156 days in 2023, and they describe how their processes impact resolution time.

  • In 2022, the resolution time for fast food complaints was 440 days, compared to 302 days for retail complaints.
  • In 2014, when the paid sick leave law launched, it took 33 days to resolve complaints in the first year.
  • The agency developed a team of data scientists to move from paper records to data analytics for evaluating employer records.
  • This shift from analog to digital processing enabled quicker case resolution.

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QUESTION

# What is the impact of the Starbucks complaints on the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection's response time?

0:27:08

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125 sec

The Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP) groups multiple complaints about the same business together for investigation. The commissioner explains that while there are at least 76 Starbucks complaints, some of which date back to February 2022, only 4 related to 'just cause' allegations were resolved last year, as those are prioritized, especially if a worker wants their job back.

  • The DCWP is achieving record numbers in recovering funds for workers.
  • More workers are coming forward with complaints.
  • The agency is improving its complaint processing systems.
  • Investigations may take longer but cover more workers by taking a proactive approach that examines entire workplaces rather than single complaints.

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QUESTION

# What was the amount of restitution recovered for workers last year and how many staff handle investigations?

0:29:14

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49 sec

The Office of Labor Policy and Standards at the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection recovered $12,000,000 in worker relief in 2023, benefiting 9,580 workers.

  • The Office of Labor Policy and Standards currently has a staff of 44 with no vacancies.
  • 19 staff members are investigators on the investigations team.

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QUESTION

# What are the processes for investigating worker protection cases and securing restitution for workers?

0:30:35

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179 sec

The Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP) details its comprehensive process for investigating worker protection cases. The process covers the following steps:

  • Workers file complaints online which are assigned to DCWP investigators
  • Investigators collect documents from workers and employers
  • A team reviews documents to identify violations
  • The DCWP then attempts to resolve cases through settlements, or files cases at the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings (OATH) if no agreement is reached
  • The administration has secured $37 million in restitution for workers

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QUESTION

# What is the prevalence of cases related to paid sick days and efforts to raise awareness?

0:33:34

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99 sec

The commissioner states that cases related to paid sick days come in at a steady pace.

  • The Department of Consumer And Worker Protection (DCWP) conducts outreach to educate workers about their right to paid sick days
  • Outreach efforts are sometimes focused on specific industries
  • The DCWP is engaging with the private bar to inform them about individuals' right to file private legal actions
  • No private lawsuits have been reported since the most recent additions to the paid sick days law went into effect

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QUESTION

# What resources does the Office of Labor Policy and Standards (OLPS) need to improve enforcement of the fair workweek law?

0:35:27

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54 sec

The DCWP commissioner states that OLPS is currently fully staffed to conduct its work enforcing the fair workweek law and having credible success.

  • More resources would allow OLPS to do more, but they have not quantified what level of additional resources would be needed.
  • DCWP is open to having conversations about increasing resources if OLPS's mandate increases.
  • If anything new comes up, DCWP will have conversations with OMB to ensure OLPS has resources to do its job properly.

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QUESTION

# What outreach events were conducted by the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection regarding worker rights and business compliance in 2023 and 2024?

0:36:23

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36 sec

The Assistant Commissioner states that the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection conducted around 620 to 650 outreach events per year since the start of the administration, with about one-third of those events geared towards worker rights and business compliance.

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QUESTION

# How does the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection track investigations and make the data public?

0:37:25

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21 sec

The Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP) uses a database system called METS to track investigations related to worker protections. The results and data from METS are made public.

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QUESTION

# How many worker protection investigations were opened by the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection in the first quarter of 2024?

0:37:47

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17 sec

The Commissioner of the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP) states that 134 worker protection investigations were opened in the first quarter of 2024.

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QUESTION

# How often does the agency initiate investigations without a complaint being filed?

0:38:05

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64 sec

The commissioner does not provide a specific number or percentage on how often the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP) opens investigations proactively without a precipitating complaint.

  • The DCWP does not track proactive investigations separately from complaint-driven ones.
  • When a complaint is received, the DCWP checks for violations across the entire workforce, not just the individual complaint.
  • The agency looks for issues related to the specific law cited in the complaint as well as other potential labor law violations.
  • This approach aims to address all violations comprehensively when investigating a complaint.

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QUESTION

# How does the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection provide language access at outreach events and for worker education?

0:39:10

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63 sec

The Assistant Commissioner explains that half of the agency's staff speaks a language other than English, and between those staff members, they speak 44 languages, allowing them to leverage multilingual employees for events requiring language access.

  • They utilize vendors to provide in-person interpretation services.
  • The agency has access to a language line for handling complaints filed in the field.
  • Partnerships with community-based organizations that speak the languages of local communities are important for facilitating education and receiving complaints.

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QUESTION

# What is the total number of events the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP) has conducted on workers' rights since the Fair Workweek Law was enacted?

0:40:14

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41 sec

The DCWP has conducted 1,400 events on workers' rights since the Fair Workweek Law was enacted in 2018.

  • From 2022 to 2023, the DCWP has conducted around 650 events per year on workers' rights.
  • The DCWP is on pace to conduct a similar number of events in 2024.
  • The events covered topics such as the Fair Workweek Law, paid safe and sick leave.

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QUESTION

# What steps is the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection taking to reduce the time it takes to close cases and enforce the Fair Workweek Law?

0:40:57

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156 sec

The Commissioner explains that the agency is looking at ways to become more efficient and shorten case resolution times.

  • They are exploring using technology and data scientists to more quickly analyze data
  • They have improved their online complaint form to gather all necessary information upfront
  • They are having ongoing conversations with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) about funding needs for new mandates like Fair Workweek enforcement

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QUESTION

# What is the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection's (DCWP) approach to communicating with employers about compliance and ensuring open lines of communication?

0:43:40

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140 sec

The DCWP engages directly with employers to ensure their compliance with worker protection laws.

  • It conducts roundtables with major companies and their executives to clarify laws and answer questions
  • It hosts webinars and provides online resources like videos, FAQs, and compliance tools with formulas
  • It updates materials based on real-life investigation findings to address common compliance issues
  • It recently updated its 'worker bill of rights' booklet explaining worker rights at all levels
  • It utilizes social media and paid advertising to reach workers

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QUESTION

# What efforts is the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection making to help employers comply with worker scheduling laws?

0:46:02

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100 sec

The Department of Consumer and Worker Protection is working with scheduling software providers to ensure their systems support compliance with worker scheduling rules and processes.

  • DCWP does not endorse any particular software
  • However, it wants to ensure the software has detailed analytics for compliance
  • DCWP is providing feedback to the software providers on coding compliant systems
  • The goal is for employers to have tools to help maintain proper documentation

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QUESTION

# What data is collected from scheduling software to enforce labor laws, and should the city explore a municipal scheduling software system?

0:47:43

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91 sec

The Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP) does not directly receive data from scheduling software companies, but examines data in employers' systems when investigating complaints to determine compliance with labor laws.

  • The goal is to use software to prevent labor violations from occurring
  • Council Member Amanda Farías suggests exploring a free or low-cost municipal scheduling system in the future
  • This could potentially reach more people than private software options
  • It could be a future budget request from DCWP

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QUESTION

# How is the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection disseminating information about the Worker's Bill of Rights to workers and employers?

0:49:18

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163 sec

The Department of Consumer and Worker Protection is using multiple channels to share information about the Worker's Bill of Rights.

  • Employers are required to post the Bill of Rights at their places of business.
  • The Department has sent communications to its licensed businesses and permittees.
  • Information has been shared with over 600 business associations.
  • The Bill of Rights will be posted at all shelters in partnership with the Department of Social Services.
  • Information is being sent to over 1,200 community organizations.
  • Starting around May 1st, there will be on-the-ground outreach and canvassing with community partners.
  • The Department plans to engage workers directly at different locations.

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QUESTION

# What outreach has been conducted for utility safety workers regarding fair workweek laws?

0:52:05

·

38 sec

The Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP) has worked with representative organizations for utility safety workers to educate them about their rights under fair workweek laws.

  • DCWP has maintained channels of dialogue with these organizations
  • After the fair workweek law was passed a few years ago, these organizations secured new collective bargaining agreements with analogous or better protections
  • DCWP aims to remain vigilant in ensuring employers comply with the fair workweek law for utility safety workers

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QUESTION

# Is there a difference in the time it takes to resolve complaints against franchise and corporately owned fast food employers?

0:52:44

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13 sec

The deputy commissioner states that there is no difference in the length of time it takes to resolve complaints against franchise and corporately owned fast food employers.

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QUESTION

# Are there any differences in how the agency responds to schedule change complaints from part-time vs. full-time employees?

0:52:59

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36 sec

The agency does not differentiate between part-time and full-time employees when responding to complaints about schedule changes.

  • For any Fair Workweek Law complaint, the agency interviews the complainant
  • They aim to understand the scope of alleged violations
  • They identify if there are other affected workers
  • The employment status (part-time or full-time) does not impact how they handle the complaint

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QUESTION

# What is the average number of days it takes to resolve complaints under the Fair Workweek Law in 2024?

0:53:36

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15 sec

The Commissioner of the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection states that the average number of days to resolve complaints under the Fair Workweek Law in 2024 is 115 days.

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TESTIMONY

# Autumn Weintraub, Fast Food Director at 32BJ SEIU, on Enforcement of Fair Workweek Laws in the Fast Food Industry

0:56:25

·

3 min

Weintraub highlights the importance of enforcing Fair Workweek laws to ensure predictable schedules and sufficient hours for fast food workers.

  • She represents 32BJ SEIU, a union organizing fast food workers for better pay and conditions.
  • Despite the NYC Department of Consumer and Worker Protection's efforts, violations persist, notably by Starbucks.
  • Fast food workers face low wages and corporations reap high profits, exacerbating the need for compliance.
  • Weintraub calls for a citywide investigation into Starbucks to uphold Fair Workweek standards in the industry.

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TESTIMONY

# Max Peltcher, Starbucks Worker, on Scheduling Issues and Filing a Fair Work Week Complaint at Starbucks in New York City

0:59:49

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87 sec

Max Peltcher, a Starbucks worker, testifies about experiencing severe scheduling inconsistencies after moving to work at a Starbucks store in New York City from Iowa.

  • His scheduled hours fluctuated outside the 15% standard allowed by the Fair Workweek Law on a weekly basis.
  • He was scheduled to work outside his stated availability windows provided to management.
  • The scheduling issues impacted his finances, ability to plan his time, and overall well-being.
  • He filed a Fair Work Week complaint with the Department of Consumer And Worker Protection last summer, but it has not been resolved yet.
  • Peltcher expresses hope for justice and thanks the committee for the opportunity to testify on the importance of the Fair Workweek Law for workers.

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TESTIMONY

# Autumn Segara, Former Chipotle Employee, on Being Wrongfully Terminated and Filing a Just Cause Complaint

1:01:21

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128 sec

Autumn Segara testifies about her wrongful termination from Chipotle after reporting COVID-19 symptoms to her manager.

  • She informed her manager about her symptoms but was later fired for allegedly not reporting them
  • Segara filed a just cause complaint with the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP)
  • After over a year, DCWP resolved the complaint with an $8,500 settlement, of which $500 went to her lawyers
  • Segara states she did not want the money, but rather wanted her job reinstated at Chipotle

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TESTIMONY

# Lee Lambert, Starbucks Worker on Significant Hour Cuts and Filing a Fair Work Week Complaint

1:03:36

·

74 sec

Lee Lambert, a Starbucks worker for nearly 3 years, details experiencing significant hour cuts of over 50% at their workplace. This severely impacted their financial situation and threatened access to benefits. Lee was one of the first workers to file a Fair Work Week complaint in February of the previous year over the drastic reduction in hours, but the complaint has not been resolved.

  • Lee previously worked at the Starbucks location on 100 William Street before the hour cuts
  • Currently works at the Starbucks on Church Street in Murray
  • Appreciates agencies like DCWP that hold large corporations accountable
  • Highlights the importance of DCWP having resources to continue protecting workers' rights

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QUESTION

# How did Max Peltcher, Autumn Segara, and Lee Lambert first learn about the Fair Work Week Law?

1:04:50

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70 sec

The council member asks how the three workers first became aware of the Fair Work Week Law.

  • Max Peltcher learned about it through meetings with union organizers who informed him of his rights under the law and the ability to file complaints.
  • Lee Lambert learned about the law through their involvement with 32BJ and Starbucks Workers United.
  • Autumn Segara discovered the law after encountering a 32BJ Worker who was meeting her coworker, leading her to inquire and be informed she was covered under the Fair Work Week Law.

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QUESTION

# Were Fair Work Week postings listed or visible in workspaces?

1:06:01

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74 sec

The council member asks if Fair Work Week postings were visible in workspaces as required.

  • Autumn Segara, a worker, says at one store (at John Jay) the postings were present but management tried to alter the interpretation of the information.
  • At another store (The Little Bee), postings were present but management claimed they did not fall under the Fair Work Week law.

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QUESTION

# What has been the contact between the agency and individuals with open complaints, and how long did it take to hear back?

1:07:19

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46 sec

The agency has not had direct personal contact with the individuals who filed complaints, Lee Lambert and Max Peltcher, but has communicated with organizations representing them, such as 32BJ SEIU and Starbucks Workers United, as part of investigating their complaints.

  • Lee Lambert filed their complaint through 32BJ SEIU rather than directly with the agency
  • The agency has been in contact with 32BJ SEIU and Starbucks Workers United regarding the investigation of complaints
  • Max Peltcher also has not had any personal contact from the agency
  • The complainants themselves were not contacted directly by the agency after filing

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QUESTION

# How long did it take for the agency to contact the petitioner or representatives after complaints against Chipotle were filed?

1:08:05

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110 sec

Segara explains that it took around a year for the agency to reach out after the union 32BJ filed a complaint on behalf of Autumn Segara against Chipotle.

  • After filing the complaint with the help of 32BJ, it took a year for the agency to contact Segara or representatives.
  • Segara states that after the initial year-long wait, it took another 6 months before substantive discussions with Chipotle began.
  • During settlement negotiations, Chipotle insisted that Segara meet alone without any representatives or lawyers present.
  • An official from 32BJ SEIU says they will provide a specific timeline later regarding complaints against Starbucks.

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QUESTION

# What has been the experience with open complaints regarding communication and overall process?

1:10:01

·

70 sec

Autumn Weintraub states that dealing with large corporations on open complaints is challenging, but the agency works hard to ensure compliance and progress investigations. She expresses a desire for resolution or a citywide investigation due to systemic violations, noting a prolonged period without resolution.

  • Large corporations pose difficulties in handling open complaints
  • The agency diligently seeks compliance and advances investigations
  • There is a call for resolution or citywide probe given systemic violations
  • The process has been lengthy without reaching a resolution

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TESTIMONY

# Peter Fugiel, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations, on Enforcement Challenges of Fair Work Week Laws

1:12:01

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131 sec

Peter Fugiel, a postdoctoral research fellow at Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations, highlights issues with the enforcement of Fair Work Week laws in New York City and other jurisdictions.

  • He points out the Office of Labor Policy and Standards (OLPS) is understaffed compared to peer agencies when accounting for population and caseloads.
  • Despite successful settlements in 2022, less than 5% of covered workers received restitution through Fair Workweek enforcement.
  • More public data and collaboration between OLPS, stakeholders, and researchers is needed to improve enforcement practices.

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TESTIMONY

# Gabriel Semanario, Former Starbucks Worker, on Termination Related to Fair Workweek Issues and Financial Struggles

1:14:24

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97 sec

A former Starbucks employee testifies about being terminated after 3 years of employment in 2022 after raising fair workweek complaints. He was repeatedly scheduled outside his stated availability despite complaints, and was terminated in part for missing a shift he was improperly scheduled for. He filed a complaint over his termination that is still pending. After losing his job, he faced financial difficulties, including losing Starbucks insurance before becoming eligible and having to take a minimum wage job.

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TESTIMONY

# Christopher Leon Johnson, Member of the Public, on the Rights and Protections for Fast Food Workers and Delivery Personnel

1:16:07

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150 sec

Christopher Leon Johnson, speaking as a member of the public, advocates for better rights and protections for fast food workers and delivery personnel.

  • He discusses his background as a shop steward in a security workers' union and his efforts to support fast food workers.
  • Johnson criticizes corporations for being greedy and trying to avoid unions to fire workers easily.
  • He calls for delivery workers to be included under the same labor laws as fast food workers in New York City.
  • Johnson urges the city council to classify delivery workers in the fast food division to provide them rights and a $20 minimum wage.

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QUESTION

# What are better metrics than announced restitution for measuring success of labor law enforcement?

1:18:38

·

110 sec

The council member asks about research on other cities that identifies better metrics than announced restitution amounts for measuring the success of labor law enforcement.

  • Peter Fugiel suggests metrics like worker compliance with laws, receiving schedules in advance, and proper compensation for last-minute schedule changes.
  • Fugiel cites a Seattle study finding a secure scheduling law improved predictability, reduced last-minute shift cancellations, and benefited worker well-being.
  • No similar systematic study has evaluated impacts of New York City's labor laws on workers.

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QUESTION

# When did Gabriel Semanario file his complaint and what has been the communication from the agency?

1:20:33

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35 sec

Gabriel Semanario, a former Starbucks worker, filed his complaint in early October of the previous year.

  • The labor union 32BJ has been in consistent contact with Semanario regarding his case.
  • 32BJ recently informed Semanario that his case was being taken up.
  • Semanario had to reinstate all the details he previously provided to his lawyers.

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